Argentine Tango

 

No dance form can convey elegant passion the way the Argentine Tango does. It is the most sensual version of the Tango. It’s a celebration of life in the South American country while it was labeled dirty dancing in the United States. That’s because of those extremely sensuous moves that make up this wonderful dance form. The Argentine Tango was introduced in New York in 1921 by the silver screen’s most loved Latin Lover, Rudolph Valentino although it was a tamer version of the original.

The most sensuous dance form

The Argentine Tango is alleged to have been introduced by the gauchos or cowboys who came to town in search of female companionship. According to urban legend, weeks on horseback made their leather chaps stiff which forced them to walk with bent knees, giving rise to the male stance. The women on the other hand kept a distance to avoid the odor of a man. Whether this is true or not, there’s nothing that can take away the passion and sensuality of this dance form. Rather than the gauchos, it was Rudolph Valentino’s role in the 1926 movie, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, which had a powerful impact on male Tango stars that were quick to hop into gaucho garb.

The battle of love on the dance floor

Urban legend aside, the Argentine Tango probably emerged from the seedy districts where the Underworld ruled and brothels were in plenty. Seduction and foreplay is what the tango portrays, which many considered forbidden and obscene. However, there’s no doubt that despite its more than colorful roots, it strikes the right note and stirs up passion in all men and women. There’s plenty of depth in what the Argentine Tango stands for, which in essence is the never-ending battle for love, dominance and submission amongst human beings.

A dance through life

The Argentine Tango is driven by hot Latin rhythms that are enough to fuel the chemistry between the two partners. The dance form is about man and woman coming together, parting ways and discovering each other all over again. It’s consists a less structured style where the partners can actually improvise according to how the music stirs them. This is a dance with flair. A dance where you can dip, twirl, sweep and glide in a slow, syncopated tempo and then explode into a furious flurry of movements. The key to mastering the Argentine Tango is to alter movements according to the temp, between slow and fast, elegant and dramatic. That’s why many experts believe it’s just like dancing through life.